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20130615
20130623
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
of america, this remains a vibrant place to live with a balanced economy. the american people must have a voice about what those rules will be. and congress cannot skirt responsibility to legislate. again, i would like to close here by thanking those who led this effort, mr. collins in particular, for leading the floor conversation. he has shown great leadership, working very hard. you came here as did other members of the freshman class to make a difference by supporting the reins act and i think you will advance that cause. mr. collins: it is easy to follow in the stoot steps. and we will work to continue that fight. i thank you for being here tonight. it is now with great pleasure, another freshman who has come from north of me in north compassion for his constituents. mr. holding: i thank the gentleman from georgia for the opportunity to discuss this administration's excessive regulations. we know the harmful effect that overregulations had on the economy and since taking office, president obama and his administration have continuously burdened the american people with an exceptiona
the president more directly engaged. tax reform is going to help the american economy, help get jobs. in this comparative world of ours, we have to do everything we possibly can legitimately and reasonably to help american people, help american small business, help american multinational corporations, american companies compete better and have less red tape so they can focus more on jobs. it's a combination of substance and psychology, which i think will help spur the economy. >> i would just say that the tax code was broken and needed to be fixed, and the tax code is broken now. all three of our witnesses said the tax code was broken. the other thing i would add is the world has changed. the ability to invest around the world with the click of a mouse is so much easier, so we have to look at what other countries have done. they have modernized their tax system, and we have not. the other thing, i think, that i think is somewhat similar is you have to be very persistent. that reform would not have happened without continual persistence and effort. as economy is not as strong it needs
, and the future in 30 minutes. talking about how you size up the economy today, how we got into such a bad place in 2008, and what economic policy makers need to do next. i would like to start talking about the present. how do you assess the global economy and the u.s. economy, and the extent to which there is any momentum or possibility for faster growth? >> basically, i would describe both the united states and the rest of the world as being in a sluggish environment where effective demand, if we can use that old-fashioned term, is inadequate to galvanize the system in the growth. yet there is not enough downside weakness to create any significant short-term changes that i can see. there are very huge imbalances out there. what i find startling is there are so many things -- which nothing is happening. for example, the european central bank had this huge trillion-euro rise a couple years ago of the assets in their balance sheet. then it came down a little bit. and for the last several months it has been absolutely flat. in other words, the extent to hich nothing is happening. it is just not cr
: both sides are addressing the economy, to bring growth back. it is not easy. we are facing enormous challenges on both sides. we have different kinds of responses, different kinds of contacts in america. i think the common concern is to make sure the recovery is a sustainable one that we don't go in an up and down in terms of economic performance. i think we have established a few lines that are common. we need financial stability and we need to increase our competitiveness. we are facing enormous challenges in emerging economies. we need to adjust our economy for training and education and we need the skills in the job market. for the moment i think the g-8 has clearly identified that. we need to join efforts at the international level to create a right position. host: what needs to happen? guest: i think we need to consolidate our accounts and put our house in order in terms of the debt and deficit. that is crucial for our credibility of our efforts. at the same time, we need to invest in a new way, we need to create the sources of competitiveness for the future. so our economies
of this meeting is to fire up our economies and drive growth and prosperity around the world, to do things that make a real difference to people's lives. and there is no more powerful way to do that than by boosting trade and than by launching these negotiations on a landmark deal between the european union and the united states of america. could at 80 billion pounds to the u.s. economy and 85 billion pounds to the rest of the world. two million extra jobs, more choice and lower prices in our shops. we're talking about what could be the biggest bilateral trade deal in history. a deal that will have a greater impact than all the other trade deals put together. when we last met at camp david and suggested we could reach this moment many doubted it would be possible. everyone knows these trade deals are difficult. some take years to get off the ground and some never happen at all. it's a testament to the leadership of everyone here we've reached this point. we must maintain that political will in the months ahead. -- once in a generation opportunity and we must seize it. >> today we announced
in the eurozone and the economy. they'll discuss the trade negotiations associated with the potential transalantic trade investment partnership. they'll discuss the situation in afghanistan where germany remains a stalwart ally and continues to contribute to the mission there as well as, again, how nato can provide support beyond 2014. i don't anticipate they'll discuss syria, iran, and the middle east peace as issues we regularly consult closely with the german zone. following the bilateral meeting, a press conference. then a private lunch together at the chancellory. following that, the president will give remarks at the brandenburg gate. it comes on the 50th anniversary of president kennedy's speech at the height of the cold war when west berlin was under considerable siege. given the progress made in germany and the fall of the berlin wall, it's a true symbol of the partnership that we forged together. i expect the president would hit on broad themes in that speech associated with the shared history of the transalantic alliance, how far we've come together in germany and the other allies but t
market and economy. when the fed is by massive amounts of mortgage-backed security, it is probably not the time to turn it over to the private-sector. we reached the point now where i think it is -- and i am pleased that congress and the senate is working on a bill. i think it is time to start the dialogue. it may take yourwhen the two, bs time to start thinking about what the future should be. >> what are the preconditions, what would need to be agreed to as a step out of the way to conservatorship? what is the context that would get us to the promised land of a future? there are a whole series of principles that have to be discussed. we are investors in banks outside of the u.s., so we're used to seeing banks owning mortgages. in this country, we need to get some of the banks back in. they are starting to buy the mortgages in this country but 30-yearl not be doing fixed rate mortgages. to 15 now.ing up when the private capital to come in. banks, investor that will take credit risk. think a big decision -- probably the biggest decision will be some government support for some part
programs will affect the companies and will it impact of the internet economy overall? again i will use a little discretion and say i have three points i want to highlight. having gone to 20 eu member states to talk about government information carrying in my role as the u.s. department of homeland security privacy officer, and to say, don't worry, this was only used 96 times in 2010 -- i'm going to tell you. the relationship with the european union and the european commission are likely irreparably damaged. i used to say, no, believe me. don't worry. it will be fine. they would say, we don't believe you. you lie to us about guantanamo. you lie to us about rendition. now they have a third one in there. i also think that the concept of government and transparency has been harmed and particularly the nine named companies and at the same time the other elements, the other companies operating in this space, will have a cloud over their heads, saying, well, are you participating in this? what is the access? the point on transparency is going to have to be a thing we development. to affect th
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)